Reuse Runway 2022 Digital Program – Thistle Creative Reuse


Reuse Runway

Denton's Upcycled Fashion Show

THANK YOU to our 2022 Sponsor: Pratt Industries

Reuse Runway is hosted by Thistle Creative Reuse in collaboration with Keep Denton Beatiful, Denton Public Library, Ogle Beauty School, and Denton ISD's LGA Commercial Photography Class.

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Vote for the People's Choice Winner!

Review all of the designs and choose your  favorite. Voting will close Friday April 22, 2022 at 11:59 pm. Only one vote per person, please. The winner of this and all the other categories will be annouced Saturday, April 23rd at the Denton Redbud Festival from 12-1 pm.

Meet our Emcee

Lillia Whittington

Lillia is no stranger to fashion, recycling, and reusing materials to create something new. With her designs walking runways from Dallas to New York Fashion Week, Lillia loves to create innovative designs that will keep you looking! Pre-pandemic, Lillia was a technical designer at Dallas based clothing company, Haggar. Sharing her love of innovative pattern work, as well as pushing towards a future where fashion is for every type of body. Nowadays, you can often find her at Jupiter House meeting colleagues and friends, at Thistle Creative Studio buying second hand fabric for sewing projects, or creating tik toks on how to be a more conscious consumer for her blog, Just Lillia.

Meet the Judges

Brian Beck

Brian Beck

About Brian
I am the Denton City Councilor for District 2 and I live in the Idiot's Hill area of North East Denton. I am a PhD computational biologist by training and work for the University of Texas at Austin's Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC).
 
Maya Angelou once said, "You can't use up creativity. The more you use the more you have." I'm really looking forward to seeing everyone's creativity.
 
Why is reuse and resource conservation important to you?
Resource conservation not only extends the supply and accessibility of finite resources to future generations, but also limits the energy production and environmental impacts, creating a better quality of life for people and wildlife.
 

Desteny Edwards

Desteny Edwards

About Desteny
I am an artist, stylist, and digital content creator based in Denton, TX. I style and operate with sustainability in mind. I love fashion and especially clothes and designs that reuse materials to lessen our waste.
 
Why is reuse and resource conservation important to you?
Reuse and resource conservation is important because it’s one of the most kind and loving things you can do. It directly impacts others in the present and can help mitigate/prevent a multitude of issues futures generations will face.

Hannah Reynoso

Hannah Reynoso Toussaint

About Hannah
I am an artist and metalsmith completing a year of post-baccalaureate studies at the University of North Texas. My undergraduate degree is in theatre with an emphasis in costume deign and construction. I am a co-founder of Forever In Flux, working toward creating a sustainable queer arts scene in the greater Denton area!
 
Why is reuse and resource conservation important to you?
Being resourceful is part of being a successful artist! Using materials in unconventional or unexpected ways challenges me as an artist and also ensures a brighter future for everyone.

Melody Van Drunen

Melody Van Drunen

About Melody
I am the Director of Operations for a multi-location, award-winning salon - Davanti Salon. I am a proud Denton Native and have had the honor of being a part of the beauty industry for over 17 years.
 
Why is reuse and resource conservation important to you?
Davanti Salon prides itself on creating a space for people to create beautiful tings all while caring for the world we live in. Davanti has a passion for conservation, sustainability, and responsible products and practices.

Rachel Weaver

Rachel Weaver

About Rachel
Rachel is the Education Director for SCRAP Creative Reuse, a nonprofit network of creative reuse centers, programs, and resources. They were the Director of SCRAP Denton from 2019 - 2020, and continue to collaborate on creative reuse efforts in multiple communities. Rachel is a writer, mixed media artist, and creative with a passion for environmental sustainability and creative community building. They are based in Denton, Texas, and are a part of KUZU Community Radio, Denton Zine & Art Party, Spiderweb Salon, and local music and art shows.
 
Why is reuse and resource conservation important to you?
Reuse and resource conservation are an essential component to my environmentalism and sustainable behaviors. Choosing to reuse, upcycle, thrift, and purchase used helps reduce our material waste and hopefully reduce how much unnecessary STUFF we keep producing.

Xochitl Small Bear

Xochitl Small Bear

About Xochitl
I am a not so artsy art girl with a passion for sewing and a love of finding new ways to use objects around me.
 
Why is reuse and resource conservation important to you?
Growing up our grandmother taught us that everything we use has multiple lives in it, today a curtain, next a dress or tomorrow a new rug.

Zachary Godbee

Zachary Godbee

About Zachary
Being originally from the east coast, our family landed in the Denton area in late 2016. I am happily married to an amazing woman with four marvelous daughters. After retiring from the U.S. Army, I received a unique opportunity to work for one of the largest privately held 100% recycled corrugated box manufacturers in the U.S - Pratt Industries.
 
Why is reuse and resource conservation important to you?
Simply put, it's doing what’s right! Both are very important to my family and I for several reasons. Two that top the list are leaving things better for my children and the organization that I work for.

Meet the Designers

Anna Terry

Anna Terry

Design Photographed by:
Savanna Romano
 
Design Modeled by:
Anna Terry
 
About this Designer
Anna Terry is nine years old and in fourth grade. She loves theater, choir, soccer, science and art. Anna has had a lot of fun working along side her Mom as they have each completed there own designs. She also had fun asking family, friends and teachers to collect plastic bottle caps. Anna would like to thank everyone who donated materials and has come to the fashion show!
 
Design Fact
Because plastic caps do not get recycled properly, currently they are among the top five most commonly found items of litter on beaches worldwide.... the best way to recycle a plastic bottle is to rinse it out, replace the cap and put it in the bin. That’s it
 
Most-Used Materials in this Design
Plastic Bottle Caps, magazines, thrifted fabric, brown paper bags, thrifted dress
 
What inspired you to make this design?
I like sewing, it would be fun to do it with my mom, and in class we have been learning about recycling.
 
What was the most challenging part of making this design?
Doing it with my mom. :)

Shayna Flores

Shayna Flores

Design Photographed by:
Savanna Romano
 
Design Modeled by:
Shayna Flores
 
About this Designer
My name is Shayna, I’m 11 years old. I live in Denton. I enjoy creating outfits and jewelry. I also like to make furniture for my dolls.
 
Design Fact
Did you know that water bottle caps are one of the top five deadly trash items in the ocean? The reason is it can take them a very long time to dissolve.
 
Most-Used Materials in this Design
Plastic water bottle tops, reused cotton dress, reused materials, trims
 
What inspired you to make this design?
My inspiration is peacocks. I really like peacocks and the colors.
 
What was the most challenging part of making this design?
Spray painting the bottle caps.

NovaLee Dempsey

NovaLee Dempsey

Design Photographed by:
Chaney Tipton
 
Design Modeled by:
NovaLee Dempsey
 
About this Designer
Hi. My name is NovaLee Dempsey and I am a 10-year-old rockstar living in Denton. I love everything artistic and creative so I call myself an artiste. I entered Reuse Runway because I want to support environmental sustainability efforts and am an ambassador for Clean Energy. In short, I am here to Rock Out The Smog!
 
Design Fact
In 2020, the Environmental Protection Agency reported that about 68 million tons of air pollution were emitted into the atmosphere in the US, contributing to the “formation of ozone and particles, the deposition of acids, and visibility impairment.” The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates around 91% of the world’s population lives in places where air quality levels exceed limits. Developing and low-income countries experienced the greatest impacts from outdoor air pollution, particularly in the Western Pacific and South-East Asia regions.
 
Most-Used Materials in this Design
Guitar Picks hand cut from gift cards/credit cards/plastics, Balloons, Scape Printer Paper, Thin Wires, and Guitar Wires.
 
What inspired you to make this design?
I was wondering about air and where it comes from. So I started researching and learned about all the bad things in our air, about the air pollution. And I loved Rock Stars. So I put it all into this look.
 
What was the most challenging part of making this design?
Narrowing down the concept and how I would present it. I had so many ideas and I tried to put all of them into this dress. It didn't work.

Glory Barnes

Glory Barnes

Design Photographed by:
Chaney Tipton
 
Design Modeled by:
Glory Barnes
 
About this Designer
I am a seamstress and have been interested in these types of contests and felt like this would be a fun challenge for someone that isn’t the best at sewing. For most of my life I wasn’t very conscious of my impact on the environment, but since my sibling has started being more active in saving the planet, I felt like this would be a good place to start.
 
Design Fact
By 2050, there will be more plastic in the ocean than fish. -World Economic Forum, Ellen MacArthur Foundation and McKinsey & Company, The New Plastics Economy — Rethinking the future of plastics (2016, http:www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/publications).
 
Most-Used Materials in this Design
1. Blue Thrifted Sheet 2. Blue Recycling Trash Bags 3. White (Single Use) Grocery Bags 4. Almond Milk Containers 5. Soda Bottles
 
What inspired you to make this design?
In all honesty, I have no idea. :)
 
What was the most challenging part of making this design?
Working with trash bags.

Brianne Gette

Brianne Gette

Design Photographed by:
Chaney Tipton
 
Design Modeled by:
Emely Norvell
 
About this Designer
I am a ceramics and sculpture major at TWU with an interest in fashion. I haven't made much besides some thrifted clothing adjustments and a costume here and there, but I have watched project runway since I was a kid. I had no idea what I was doing going into this and yet, what I am putting together is something I am really proud of and I can't wait for everyone to see it!
 
Design Fact
“The average American family takes home almost 1,500 plastic shopping bags a year" (NRDC.org)
 
Most-Used Materials in this Design
Plastic bags, buttons, thrifted curtains, thrifted hula-hoops, used lamp shades.
 
What inspired you to make this design?
I wanted to embody a crafty and eco-conscious princess and what she would create for herself to wear.
 
What was the most challenging part of making this design?
Getting a hold of enough recycled material in a short amount of time to have enough material to work with. I don't use much in my household. I don't use many products with cans or bottles. Plastic bags made up most of the material I could collect on my own. The rest I had to thrift or find in other reuse stores.

La'Jasha Champion

La'Jasha Champion

Design Photographed by:
Savanna Romano
 
Design Modeled by:
La'Jasha Champion
 
About this Designer
La'Jasha Champion is a Senior at the University of North Texas and is pursuing a BFA in New Media Art. She is an interdisciplinary artist that incorporates media such as costume design, performance art, and illustration within in her artwork. Her hobbies include upcycling clothes, dancing, performing, and sewing. More information about the artist and her artwork is found on her website at lajashachampion.com.
 
Design Fact
Monarchs face habitat loss caused by deforestation in the U.S. Over 90% of the grassland ecosystems have been lost to build intensive agriculture or urban development. Recycling products such as paper will reduce deforestation that aid in these structures.
https://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/blog/monarch-butterfly-fact-sheet/ https://www.nwf.org/Educational-Resources/Wildlife-Guide/Invertebrates/Monarch-Butterfly https://www.npr.org/2021/02/26/971650046/climate-change-deforestation-threaten-monarch-butterfly-migration
 
Most-Used Materials in this Design
Paper, Acrylic Paint, Recycled Fabric, Artificial Flowers, Wire
 
What inspired you to make this design?
What inspired me to create this design was Jean Paul Gaultier's Spring 2014 Couture butterfly corset worn by Dita Von Teese.
 
What was the most challenging part of making this design?
The most challenging part was creating the butterfly wings for the skirt.

Danielle Hawiszczak

Danielle Hawiszczak

Design Photographed by:
Savanna Romano
 
Design Modeled by:
Danielle Hawiszczak
 
About this Designer
Dani is a self-taught artist and crafter who is passionate about learning new skills. She loves challenges and projects, so Reuse Runway was an instant yes. She loves watching Project Runway and has been interested in fashion design for a long time. This challenge helped her develop pattern-making skills, while learning more about the environment and conservation at the same time.
 
Design Fact
Online shopping is undeniably convenient, but it’s taking a toll on our environment. A study from Oceana in 2019 highlights this issue by uncovering staggering statistics from just one company. E-commerce tycoon Amazon dominates the market — and consequently the plastic pollution issue. In 2019, Amazon produced 465 million pounds of plastic packaging waste, including enough air pillows to circle the globe 500 times. And it’s affecting our wildlife, too. It’s estimated 90% of all sea birds and half of all sea turtles have ingested plastic. With difficult-to-recycle mailers, packaging, fillers and pillows, it’s no surprise a majority of e-com customers are calling for change.
Sources: https://oceana.org/press-releases/amazons-big-ro
 
Most-Used Materials in this Design
Bubble wrap, reused fabric trim, reused spray paint, reused mesh
 
What inspired you to make this design?
I was unpacking boxes at work and realized we were about to throw away about 10 yards of bubble wrap. I thought "that's enough to make a dress."
 
What was the most challenging part of making this design?
I learned a bit about pattern making because I really wanted to create a dress that actually fit like my standard clothes. I also broke a needle trying to sew it, so I had to switch to glue.

Lindsey Baisman

Lindsey Baisman

Design Photographed by:
Chaney Tipton
 
Design Modeled by:
Lindsey Baisman
 
About this Designer
Teacher of 10 years enjoys recycled art projects, ballroom dancing, fashion, writing and growing my faith in God. My mission is to one day create better schools for students and to end Human Trafficking. Lastly, author of the upcoming book “From Darkness to Light; A memoir of finding Jesus and moving from a traumatic life to a new journey with Christ.”
 
Design Fact
Bible scripture 1 Kings 7. -Solomon builds his Temple.
 
https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=1%20Kings%207&version=NIV The cons of Fast Fashion. https://earth.org/fast-fashions-detrimental-effect-on-the-environment/ COVID Litter https://theconversation.com/amp/covid-litter-we-mapped-discarded-masks-and-gloves-in-11-countries-with-the-help-of-citizen-science-171078
 
Most-Used Materials in this Design
Vintage fabric, vintage buttons, vintage pearl buttons, masks, and curtain holders.
 
What inspired you to make this design?
I was inspired to make this wedding dress from king Solomon’s account (In Kings 7.) of creating his detailed and extravagant palace out of Gold and floral engravings. “The capitals on top of the pillars in the portico were in the shape of lilies, four cubits high (1 Kings 7:19).
 
What was the most challenging part of making this design?
Hand painting the gold trim around the shawl.

Dara Fry

Dara Fry

Design Modeled by:
Marly Toich
 
About this Designer
I am a native Texan, resident of Flower Mound. I have been sewing and crafting for more than 50 years and just started making outfits out of nonconventional materials about six years ago when my daughter wanted a dress made out of playbills for a Broadway convention. The crafts that I enjoy most involve paper and fabric.
 
Design Fact
Electronic waste represents only 2% of America’s trash that winds up in landfills. But it equals 70% of all the toxic waste due to the metals contained in them. Up to 50 million metric tons are disposed of worldwide every year. it is the fastest growing waste stream in America according to the EPA. (Source: DoSomething.org)
 
Most-Used Materials in this Design
Phone cords and plastic bottles
 
What inspired you to make this design?
The shape and color of the chords inspired me to use these materials and find a design that worked with them.
 
What was the most challenging part of making this design?
Macramé phone cords that are not the most flexible element has been the most difficult part.

Lauren Cordova

Lauren Cordova

Design Photographed by:
Chaney Tipton
 
Design Modeled by:
Lauren Cordova
 
About this Designer
The essence of Lauren Cordova can be summed up thusly—Loves Cats; Hates Waste; Ravenclaw.
 
Design Fact
Tyvek is non-woven high density polyethylene fabric. It is lightweight, breathable, and water-resistant. Most people know Tyvek from those indestructible mailing envelops, but you yourself may be living in a Tyvek envelope and not even know it! That’s HDPE barriers such as Tyvek HomeWrap are the most common type water-resistant barriers used in new home construction. Perhaps you’ve driven by a construction site and seen the naked frames of houses being clothed in a large white sheets. That’s Tyvek! Considering that over 16 million new private homes were constructed last year alone, there’s a lot of scrap Tyvek out there that could be repurposed into water-resistant clothing, tents, and packaging.
 
Additionally, this wonder material’s breathability and resistance to bacterial penetration means it’s widely used in health care settings. Sterile devices are packaged and shipped in it, and you’ve probably seen medical personel in full-body Tyvek PPE garments when treating highly contagious diseases such as Ebola or COVID-19. Annually, 200 million protective garments are produced, used, and discarded. Recycling these garments is difficult, and therefore the vast majority end up in landfills.
 
^ https://www.dupont.com/news/tyvek-50th-anniversary.html ^^ https://www.census.gov/construction/nrc/pdf/newresconst.pdf
 
Most-Used Materials in this Design
Tyvek HouseWrap. Mylar.
 
What inspired you to make this design?
I love the properties of Tyvek and would like to see more of it being repurposed.
 
What was the most challenging part of making this design?
My biggest challenge was obtaining scrap Tyvek from a construction site without having to dumpster dive.

April Spring Powell

April Spring Powell

Design Photographed by:
Savanna Romano
 
Design Modeled by:
April Spring Powell; Olivia Meadow; Ivy Rogue
 
About this Designer
I am a multi-faceted, multi-media artist with an ongoing approach to fashion as art. I have a passion for finding eco-minded solutions to everyday problems of waste. As a mother of two wonderful girls, my artistic expression is often fulfilled through creating beautiful wearable art for my children with materials mostly consisting of repurposed or salvaged materials.
 
Design Fact
Municipal solid waste facilities process an average of 5 pounds of solid waste per person per day to a total of nearly 300 million tons of garbage every year (EPA.gov). Increased attention and available information about waste have had a positive effect on making recycling a regular part of the daily routine for American consumers. Over time, recycling and composting rates have increased from just over 6 percent of Municipal Solid Waste generated in 1960 to about 32.1 percent in 2018 (EPA.gov).
 
While many items are able to be recycled, the question remains, what to do about everyday use items that cannot be recycled at most municipal facilities. Chief among these non-recyclables are the bags that contain the vast variety of snacks ubiquitous with American lifestyles. From bags for chips to candies, the mixed composition of snack food packaging precludes them from being recycled at many recycling centers, including those local to the DFW area (dallascityhall.com). So how much waste are we talking about? It is estimated that over 200 million potato chip bags alone, from a single manufacturer were consumed last year (Time.com; Washingtonpost.com). These figures alone indicate how limited any efforts in recycling are currently.
 
My design is composed almost entirely of these non-recyclable materials collected from my family and friends over the few months. I have chosen this as a medium to highlight the unnecessary waste that occurs every day, even by those of us that strive to make a difference in maintaining and preserving the environment for future generations. It may be impractical to suggest massive increase in community budgets to allow for the inclusion of these items to be recycled. It would also likely be unpopular to suggest people simply opt out of partaking of their favorite snack. What can be done however, is consumers can work to encourage manufacturers to move to sustainable and even compostable forms of packaging, already in use by some, to reduce the negative environmental impact of these items. However, until recycling technology and capacity does catch up to meet the demand of our consumption, it is incumbent on us to find a new use for these items so that while their impact is somewhat inevitable, a greater use can come from them than simply to deliver a tasty treat.
 
https://dallascityhall.com/departments/sanitation/Pages/recycling.aspx https://www.epa.gov/facts-and-figures-about-materials-waste-and-recycling/national-overview-facts-and-figures-materials#:~:text=Over%20time%2C%20recycling%20and%20composting,to%2032.1%20percent%20in%202018. https://time.com/3030517/pepsico-lays-fewer chips/#:~:text=Lay's%20potato%20chips%20bring%20in,bag%20is%20somewhere%20aroun %20%244 https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2014/07/24/no-you-arent-crazy-some-lays-potato-chip-bags-actually-do-have-fewer-chips-inside/
 
Most-Used Materials in this Design
Polypropylene packaging and other plastic, food and product packaging.
 
What inspired you to make this design?
A new found interest in traditional quilting, as well as rainbows and singing in the rain.
 
What was the most challenging part of making this design?
Learning to quilt and working with very unconventional fabrics and colors.

Michelle Terry

Michelle Terry

Design Photographed by:
Savanna Romano
 
Design Modeled by:
V'Ann Giuffre
 
About this Designer
Michelle Terry is a first time participant in Reuse Runway. Michelle is not a fashion designer by any means, but a lifelong creative who loves new challenges and crafts. She has been so excited to spend time working alongside her talented daughter as she has created her own design. Michelle is a Colleyville resident who went to college in Denton and loves to spend time in Denton on the weekends with her family.
 
Design Fact
I used both plastic and paper grocery bags in my design. Plastic bags have caused me a lot of grief lately bc I heard you should not recycle them bc it contaminate the recycle stream. After researching I found this: (Small segments edited from the following website) https://earth911.com/recycling-guide/how-to-recycle-plastic-bags/ "Can I recycle plastic bags in my curbside recycling program? -While there are a handful of curbside programs on both coasts that accept plastic bags curbside to keep them out of the oceans, you’ll definitely want to check with your local program before recycling plastic bags at the curb. -If you ask a recycling official in the U.S. what is the #1 source of contamination in a city’s curbside program, the answer is almost always “plastic bags.” People see the recycling symbol on the product and assume it can be included with other plastics. Unfortunately, bags are usually a nightmare for the machinery at recycling centers.
 
Why Recycle Plastic Bags -Plastic bags are among the most common sources of marine debris, where they can be mistaken as food by birds and fish. -Plastic bags don’t biodegrade, meaning it will take hundreds of years for them to decompose in a landfill. -Recycling a ton of plastic bags (about 450,000 bags) saves 11 barrels of oil.
 
Which is better for the environment: paper or plastic bags?
-When it comes to production, paper bags require 2.2 times more energy and 4.7 times more water to manufacture than plastic bags. Paper bags are also nine times heavier, meaning they use more energy to transport. -When it comes to disposal, both products are very easy to recycle, but paper bags are accepted in far more curbside programs. Paper bags are also an insignificant source of marine debris, and they biodegrade, unlike plastic."
 
So overall, I learned that I am going to try my best to forgo the bag or bring my own. If it's not an option, pick paper. And the biggest thing I learned was to remember that there is an order 1. Reduce 2. Reuse 3. Recycle
 
Most-Used Materials in this Design
1- Plastic grocery bags, 2- Brown paper bags and packaging, 3- Promotional magazines and mailers, 4- Water/ soda bottles with labels, 5- plastic take out containers.
 
What inspired you to make this design?
The amount of stuff in my recycle and trash! How I don't know what I can really recycle, if it makes it through the system or just gets thrown away anyway (and messes up the good recycling!). And how COVID has made my family find it really easy to rely on a disposable plastic "take out" lifestyle". This project has helped me to see how super fast and easy it was to collect materials mostly out of my own household, and to making some simple changes like less paper plates and plastic water bottles, more reusable grocery bags, etc.
 
What was the most challenging part of making this design?
Cutting, melting and coloring the plastic- the different types of plastic can all be so different and hard to work with.

Reuse Runway Rules

  1. 1. Fashions must be made from at least 75% reuse or recyclable materials that would otherwise be thrown away or recycled or materials purchased or found secondhand. Thrifted items are acceptable as they are considered what is called reuse materials. Fashions can include cardboard, steel/tin, repurposed fabric or clothing, aluminum, plastics, paper cartons, chipboard, newspaper, mixed papers (magazines, junk mail, and catalogs), paper bags, glass and more. Used clothing will only be accepted if it has been significantly repurposed and redesigned into something substantially “new.”
    2. Contest pieces must be durable enough for wear throughout the runway show, and optional photo shoot.
    3. Each designer/team must submit an environmental fact by March 25th that connects their design with resource conservation, climate change, or some other facet of environmental sustainability. These facts will be printed in the digital program for the event along with the participants profile. The fact must cite source(s) and relate to the piece or materials in their piece in some way. The fact may not be longer than 200 characters. The fact MUST use reputable sources to back up all claims made. We will provide a free virtual research workshop for all participants.
    4. Each designer/team must submit a list of the top 5 most-used materials in their piece by March 25th.
    5. Design teams may have up to, but no more than, 3 people.6. Each designer/team must submit a short, 5 minute video in which they answer predetermined questions about their piece and the creation process as a part of the judging process.
    7. Each entry must provide their own model. The model does not have to be a part of the design team.
    8. For every optional workshop that a designer/team attends, they will receive 1/2 point toward their final score.
  2. 9. Participants must attend their judge interview on Saturday April 9th and the runway show rehearsal on Friday, April 22 from 5:30 pm - 7 pm.
 

Prizes will be awarded in each of the following categories:

Best overall design in each age category (Age category is based on designer’s age; if an adult makes a garment for a child then she/he/they will be judged in the adult category)

Ages

  • 9-11
    13-17
    18-25
    26 and older

‘Best of’ Categories (chosen from across all age groups)
Most creative use of materials

  • Best Environmental Message
    Online Favorite (chosen before runway show by vote)
 

Reuse Runway at the Denton Redbud Festival 2022

Date

Time

Event

Jan. 13 + 24

6 PM

Virtual Information Meeting

Feb 22

6 PM

Virtual Information Meeting

Feb 24

5:30-7:30 pm

Open studio + Brainstorming time at Armadillo Ale Works

March 4

6 PM

Registration Closes

March 6

3-5 PM

Open studio time at Armadillo Ale Works

March 8

6:30 PM

Virtual Library Research Workshop

March 21

6:30 PM - 7:30 PM

Virtual Intro to Basic Hand Sewing: Learn a running stitch and how to sew on a button w/Donna Gregory

March 24

5:30-7:30 pm

Open studio + Finishing Touches at Armadillo Ale Works

March 25

6 PM

First draft of virtual program information due

April 1

6 PM

Final draft of virtual program information due

April 3

6 PM

Short videos due

April 9

8 AM

Professional Hair and Makeup by Ogle Beauty School

April 9

9 AM

Mandatory Judging Interviews

April 9

10 AM

Photo Shoot Begins

April 22

5:30 PM

Mandatory Runshow Show Rehearsal

April 23

12 - 1 PM

Runway Show at the Denton Redbud Festival

 

 

 

Optional Photo Shoot

Denton ISD's ATC Photography students will be photographing models in pieces on April 9th. Ogle Beauty School will provide professional hair and make up.